Barbells Annapolis MD

Local resource for barbells in Annapolis. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to weight training and weight equipment, as well as advice and content on weightlifting.

Dick's Sporting Goods
(410) 768-9372
Glen Burnie Mall
Glen Burnie, MD
 
Sports Authority
(301) 352-5690
4520 Mitchellville Road
Bowie, MD
Services
Golf Day Shop, Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Modell's Sporting Goods
(410) 799-2611
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Hanover, MD
Hours
10:00AM - 9:30PM MONDAY - SATURDAY
11:00AM - 7:00PM SUNDAY

Dixie Sporting Goods
(410) 827-0280
316 Timber Ln
Grasonville, MD
 
Sports Authority
(301) 483-0062
3335 Corridor Marketplace
Laurel, MD
Services
Golf Trade-In Program, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Modell's Sporting Goods
(410) 266-3195
160-A Jennifer Road
Annapolis, MD
Hours
9:00AM - 9:30PM MONDAY - SATURDAY
10:00AM - 7:00PM SUNDAY

Sports Authority
(410) 761-1151
595 E. Ordnance Road
Glen Burnie, MD
Services
Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Sports Authority
(301) 333-3737
1000 Shoppers Way
Largo, MD
Services
Golf Day Shop, Golf Hitting Cage, Golf Trade-In Program, Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Delivery & Assembly
Hours
Monday - Saturday: 9:00am - 9:30pm
Sunday: 10:00am - 8:00pm
Holiday hours may vary.

Winchester Creek Outfitters
(410) 827-7000
303 Winchester Creek Rd
Grasonville, MD
 
Gotta Run Running Shop
(410) 263-0010
168 Main St
Annapolis, MD

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Home Training Basics

January 15, 2008 by Iron Man Magazine  

Home Training

If you’d rather start your bodybuilding program at home, you’ll want to purchase the right equipment to make real muscle-building workouts possible and to ensure that they’re safe as well. Here are the basics for a good home gym:

-At least a 7′ x 7′ area
-Chinning bar
-A comfortable, adjustable bench with uprights and a leg extension /leg curl
-110-pound iron barbell set
-Extra weight (start with four 20- or 25-pound plates)
-Calf block

For more on home training see IRON MAN ’s Home Gym Handbook at www.Home-Gym.com .

Get Started Routine
Monday, Wednesday and Friday or Tuesday and Thursday

Squats 2 x 10∗
Stiff-legged deadlifts 2 x 10
Standing calf raises 2 x 10
Bench presses 2 x 10
Pulldowns or chins 2 x 10
Bent-over barbell rows 2 x 10
Seated dumbbell presses 2 x 10
Dumbbell upright rows 2 x 10
Lying triceps extensions 2 x 10
Standing barbell curls 2 x 10

∗2 x 10 means you do two sets of eight to 10 repetitions before you move on to the next exercise. Before those work sets, do one warmup set with about 80 percent of your work-set poundage.

Note: Rest one to 1 1/2 minutes between sets; use a watch or clock with a second hand to time your rest.

We’ve covered all the exercises over the last 10 issues, and we’ve even provided start/finish photos of each one. You have no excuse. If you haven’t started, g...

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Thick-Bar Training for Strength

January 28, 2010 by Charles Poliquin  

Q: I’m in a rut in my strength development. I need to get my power clean scores up. I will be tested by my college, and I need to up my numbers. Any new tricks?

A: One of my strength-coaching colleagues told me that in the early ’70s, during a press conference prior to a Russia-vs.-U.S. wrestling competition, someone mentioned that the American wrestler in the 165-pound-bodyweight class could bench-press 365 pounds—quite a remarkable accomplishment at the time, especially for a nonpowerlifter. Athletes weren’t using the elaborate equipment they have today, which can add hundreds of pounds to a raw performance. The Russian counterpart responded by producing two pairs of pliers and proceeded to squeeze them so hard that they snapped. After the match the defeated U.S. wrestler commented that when the Russian grabbed his arms, he felt as if they were locked in a vise and that he immediately began to lose sensation in his arms and hands. Again, the U.S. wrestler was certainly much stronger than the Russian from a weightlifting standpoint, but the Russian had achieved a remarkable degree of functional strength for his sport.

In every facility that I’m asked to help design, I insist that the owners purchase calibrated, thick-handled barbells and dumbbells . It’s important not to sacrifice quality for price. I say that because I know that several companies now offer thick barbells, but to keep the price down, those bars usually don’t rotate. Essentially, all you’re getting is a large metal pipe. Without the rotation, you can put considerable stress on your elbows and wrists. That discourages many athletes from using the bars. For the best thick bars that rotate and even hold Olympic plates, I recommend checking out Grace Fitness (www.GraceFitness.com).

One problem many strength coaches have is with inferring practical information from sciences such as motor learning. Not surprisingly, the themes of many seminars in strength training deal with “bridging the gap” between science and biophysical application.

Post-tetanic potentiation, or PTP, is a motor-learning concept that Roger M. Enoka defines in his remarkable textbook Neuromechanical Basis of Kinesiology. He writes: “The magnitude of the twitch force is extremely variable and depends on the activation history of the muscle. A twitch elicited in a resting muscle does not represent the maximal twitch. Rather, twitch force is maximal following a brief tetanus [a condition of prolonged or repeatedly induced muscle contraction]; this effect is known as post-tetanic potentiation of twitch force.” What that means is that a more powerful muscular contraction can be achieved if the contraction is preceded by a strong muscular contraction.

Now let me show you how to apply PTP to Olympic lifting. For a female lifter it’s not necessary to use the thick-handled barbells to get the effect. Two types of barbells are used in weightlifting c...

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